A Closer Look at Start-up Nation: Prologue

The author’s copy of the text (feat. half a pad of mini post-its)

Fifty MBA students from Columbia and Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya met up tonight in Tel Aviv to kick off a week-long intensive course, “A Closer Look at Start-up Nation”. Inspired by Dan Senor and Saul Singer’s 2009 book, “Start-up Nation: The Story of Israel’s Economic Miracle”, the 5-day course will introduce students to individuals from all areas of Israel’s innovation ecosystem – from start-ups and research and development (R&D) divisions of multinational firms to venture capitalists (VCs) and business-focused non-profits. We hope to take away valuable learnings about the genesis of Israel’s start-up culture, how to work with Israel’s high-tech industry, and – more broadly – how a cluster of factors can lead to innovation-rich geographies such as “Silicon Wadi” (the Israeli “Silicon Valley”).

Israel leads the world in per capita R&D spending – benefitting from both the R&D divisions of large multinationals such as Intel, Google, and Microsoft as well as a high concentration of start-ups. Outside Silicon Valley, Israel claims the top spot in per capita start-ups and is also the world leader in per capita VC investments. Not confined to early-stage ventures alone, Israel has more companies listed on Nasdaq than Korea, India, and Japan combined.

The book, for those who have not had the chance to read it, does a wonderful job of weaving together the aspects of Israel’s history and sociopolitical structures that contribute to this innovation-rich environment. As an example, the book explores the non-hierarchical nature of Israeli society and how a willingness to challenge the status quo leads to more innovative thought and design. Mandatory conscription in the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) serves to enshrine egalitarianism as a societal value and instills a mission-driven culture amongst citizens. Lastly, on a cultural note, failure is not viewed as shameful but rather as an aspect of growth and development in life. While each of these conditions may be found in a number of societies, the book argues that it is the union of these factors that has allowed Israel to become the high-tech powerhouse it is today.

This blog will view the course through the lens of Senor and Singer’s text – providing updates on the latest decade of Israeli start-up development as well as supplementary learnings related to the themes found in the book. It is our hope that, through careful evaluation of this confluence of factors, we can identify the most crucial aspects necessary to build a culture of innovation – and what competitive advantage, if any, can persist for Israel’s high-tech sector in the long-run.

Casey Buckley is a 2020 MBA Candidate at Columbia Business School

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