Tips for CBS Capitalists Coming to Cuba

Cuba: the land of cigars, rum, and pre-conceived notions.

maxresdefault

A group of 28 CBS students are venturing to Havana this Saturday. Despite what many Americans may think, Cuba is a “low” travel risk country, and you can still visit despite President Trump’s travel restrictions. If you don’t know the first thing about actually living in a communist nation (or perhaps if you’ve just heard Camila Cabello’s song “Havana” and are feeling particularly inspired), I’m here to give you a few pointers we learned in our pre-class sessions prior to departing for Cuba.

  1. Cuba has two currencies. If you’re not Cuban, you have to bring cash. There are two currencies, the CUC (Cuban Convertible Peso, or “kook”) and the CUP (monida nacional, 1.00 CUC = 25.00 CUP). The CUC is not traded internationally and is used in all the enterprises that use hard currencies such as: stores, hotels, privates and state restaurants, bars, cafeterias, taxis and car rental agencies. You can only access CUC as a non-Cuban citizen, and the official exchange rate for dollars is $0.873. If you’re changing money, expect to pay a 10% tax on USD that Euros, CAS and other currencies don’t have. The US credit cards and ATM cards will not work. fullsizerender-3-copy
  2. Don’t expect your iPhone to work. Though telecom in Cuba has vastly improved, it is still at times slow and unreliable. Internet is limited to hotel lobbies and public Wi-Fi hotspots scattered throughout major cities. You can roam in Cuba with your cell phone, but rates are very high. Try downloading Maps.me or OSMAND for functional offline map apps of Cuba.
  3. Don’t forget your papers! The US currently has a comprehensive set of trade and travel restrictions in place with Cuba (the “Cuban Embargo”). Under this embargo, only certain types of travel is authorized to Cuba. Entities are granted permission to organize educational tours, business trips, research delegations, and conferences. We are visiting under the educational visa, through Cuba Educational Travel. The Cuban government and citizens open their arms to visitors, but at times we may receive questioning about why we are visiting (especially at US customs when coming back).
  4. Tipping well is a social good. Cuba is a communist country. Doctors and engineers sometimes are motivated to work as hotel attendants or taxi drivers, because they have contact with hard currency. If they worked in their normal professions, they could be paid $20 a month – versus $100+ a day that can be earned from foreign tips! tippingincuba04
  5. You don’t need to worry about getting ill when you’re in Havana. Well – to some extent! It’s never good to get ill, but Cuban doctors are best in class. Cuba infant mortality rate is lower, at an estimated 4.76 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2013, compared to 5.90 for the United States. The life expectancy in Cuba about the same if not greater than the US. The Pan American Health Organization found in 2012 that life expectancy was 79.2 years in Cuba, compared to 78.8 years in the U.S.

Now, onto packing… looking forward to this forecast!

-Jill Wang, 18

Screen Shot 2018-03-08 at 10.17.09 AM

What are your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s