Reflexiones después de regresar de Cuba (Reflections after returning from Cuba)

It’s hard to imagine that just a couple weeks ago, I was traveling through Cuba, learning about the business environment, culture, and history of the country. For this final post, I asked my classmates to contribute their own reflections, opinions, and photos. I’m grateful and excited to share their contributions and insights with you.

Group by Che sign 照片 2017-3-16 15 15 35_photo by Adam.jpg
Our class in Cuba, photo courtesy of Adam Fu

“The highlight of our trip to Cuba was striking up a conversation with a local woman who then invited us into her home to tell us about her experiences during the revolution. She then made us Cuban coffee, showed us pictures of her family, and had us call her abuelita.” – Oliver

Oliver and Ron_Cuba 2017
Oliver and Ron, photo courtesy of Oliver Noteware

“Cuba exceeded my expectations on many levels. One thing I found fascinating is how advanced Cuba is on gender issues in comparison to the United States. Despite the low salaries, women and men are paid equally. In terms of abortion, all women have the right to abort. Here in the United States, we are still fighting for pay equality and for abortion rights. “ – Silvana

“After visiting Cuba, I now realize how easier it is to live in a country with no crime and violence. However, I also understand how lucky I am to have been given opportunities to pursue my dreams.” – Federico

照片 2017-3-15 09 13 45_photo by Adam Fu
Stephanie, TJ. and Tatiana, photo courtesy of Adam Fu
照片 2017-3-15 09 42 24_photo by Adam
Natasha, Teresa, Isobel, and Silvana, photo courtesy of Adam Fu

“After visiting Cuba, I now realize that the allure of the island for Americans is the fact that we mostly forbidden to go. Cuba has a long way to go if it wants to consistently attract tourists in the future.” – T.J.

“One thing that surprised me was the openness that young Cuban people had to discussing how the current system benefits them, as well as their ideas for how to improve it. The most interesting thing I learned was that workers have the daily newspaper (and novels) read to them as they work in state-operated cigar factories. I was really moved by the state’s commitment to ongoing education for Cuban citizens. After visiting Cuba, I now realize the many ways in which the system there works for the Cuban people, and I feel excited to see how that system adapts in upcoming years to provide even more opportunity for young Cubans.” – Natasha

Marc and Jefferson at steps_Cuba 2017_photo by Laila
Marc and Jefferson at organic farm, photo courtesy of Laila Marouf
Photo Mar 12, 12 58 23 PM_photo by Laila
Teresa and Laila, photo courtesy of Laila Marouf
Photo Mar 15, 7 15 56 PM photo by Silvana
Michele and Tatiana, photo courtesy of Silvana Ordonez

The diverse perspectives of my classmates and I reflect how many topics were touched on during our Global Immersion Program (GIP) in Cuba. To say Cuban economics and politics are complex would be an understatement, yet the Cubans we met continue to do the best they can to overcome their financial circumstances and maintain hope for the future.

Thank you to everyone who provided photos, comments, and feedback on these blog posts. And thank you to Chazen and CBS for this incredible opportunity!

Group lunch 照片 2017-3-16 12 38 58_photo by Adam.jpg
Professor Meier, Maggie Hopkins (Chazen), and our class, photo courtesy of Adam Fu

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