Nordic GIP Part 1: A Swift Summit in Stockholm, Sweden

Kit O’Connor ’17

STOCKHOLM (or at least begun on a train from STOCKHOLM to COPENHAGEN) – Hej again, reader(s? one can dream!). My upmost apologies for the lateness of this post; I’ve been quite waylaid with a combination of seemingly every non-lethal upper respiratory infection possible. For those of you keeping track at home, countries I’ve visited during CBS when I haven’t had to spend an entire day floating in and out of consciousness in a hotel bed: Dominican Republic, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Curacao, Mexcio (twice!), and Vietnam. Countries where I’ve missed seeing the assembly of the most expensive bed in the world: Sweden. Go figure.

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Mike Conway ’17 hanging out in a FAR more luxurious bed than I was in that day.

 

ANYWAY. The meatballs. You want to know about the meatballs, not my health. They’re great! We did have to wait until the second day to taste them, however, as the first night included an even more unique Swedish dish: reindeer!

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Not quite Instagram-worthy, but Dasher tasted wonderful. There was a very Christmas-y vibe.

 

A couple observations about life/business in Sweden. First, gender equality is extremely important – we saw just as many men pushing around strollers as we did women, and, even at our nicest meals, there was no order to the service (i.e., both men and women were served according to seat position, not gender).

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One of our nicest dinners was at Bread & Table, generously sponsored by CBS alumnus Per Börjesson.*

Second, consensus is critical in corporate governance. As opposed to a more hierarchical system, where a manager decides the best course of action, it’s much more likely to be a group decision at every stage of the corporate ladder. Though this necessarily can slow down the pace of action, it creates a more cohesive environment where everyone in the organization is more aligned with the overall goals (in theory, at least).

I’ll leave you for now with this picture of the oldest church in Sweden, Storkyrkan. Besides being visually stunning, it’s also ancient – on a board listing events in the building’s history, there was a gap of 292 years, which one student noted was longer than the history of the entire United States!

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“On this site from 1600-1892…nothing happened. Check elsewhere on the map.”

Next stop, Copenhagen!

*When visiting Per’s company, Spiltan Fonder, we were treated to rather unique decorations in the restroom: rejection letters from every firm he had applied to from CBS. I can relate to him on at least one level!

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