Vietnam Part 3: A Tale of Two Cities

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Kit O’Connor ‘17

HA LONG BAY & HANOI, VIETNAM – Remember in the first blog about Vietnam when I said that CBS students rarely have just one adventure at a time? Well, a group of students from Vietnam, your correspondent among them, jetted (well, vanned and hydrofoiled) off to Ha Long Bay where we spent 24 hours sailing and kayaking amongst the thousand plus islands that make up “Descending Dragon Bay”. Our guide, Chan, regaled us with the legend of thousands of dragons dropping from the sky and each forming an island over ten thousand years ago. Incidentally, Chan was the tallest Vietnamese person we met and had gotten offers to play in the professional basketball league of Hanoi, but turned them down for the more lucrative and self-fulfilling field of tourism. Yet another difference from life in the States.

 

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But I’m skipping a key part of the trip! The title of this post refers not to Hanoi and Ha Long Bay, but Hanoi and Saigon. Hanoi and Saigon are about as different as any two cities in a single country can be: Saigon is the gregarious, free-wheeling, entrepreneurial hub, while Hanoi is the buttoned-up political center with constant reminders of the government around every corner. Our company visits, to Vietcombank, GE, and General Motors, were dominated by talks of how the companies were backed by (or cooperated with) the government in order to conduct business properly in Vietnam. One particularly instructive moment occurred when a student asked about a curious projected 2017 reversal of a falling inflation rate. The answer, courtesy of Vietcombank, which is majority-owned by the government of Vietnam: the set price for basic services is going to be increased.

 

file_000-11Wait, who’s that in the background next to the sickle? Enhance…

file_000-9That’s right, a statue of Ho Chi Minh in the conference room of the bank!

These visits stood in stark contrast to the meetings with the American Chamber of Commerce and US Embassy in Hanoi. The Americans (and a Brit and Canadian) stressed the unpredictability of the government moves and expressed frustration that the deck often seemed to be stacked in favors of locals with connections. However, both consistently praised the young and educated population and seemed to truly believe that the best years of Vietnam are on the near horizon. I certainly came away with the impression that Vietnam has a host of fantastic investments for both the local populace and foreign capital!

That just about wraps up the in-country portion of this blog for me. I’ll be back in a week or so to give a proper summary of the trip, but I now must continue the rest of my personal adventure. On to the land down under!

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