A Cuba Visit 15 Years in the Making

When I was 13, a Cuban café opened near my house. Despite living just more than 200 miles from Havana in Southwest Florida, those Saturday lunches of ropa vieja and maduros were my first real exposure to Cuban culture. Nonetheless, I’m ultimately a simple man with a pathway to my heart that runs directly through my stomach, so my interest in Cuban culture was piqued.

While food drove this interest for the next few years (colada was the first coffee I ever enjoyed), living in Miami from age 17-25 provided ample opportunity to deepen my connection to Cuban culture. From formal study of Cuban Cold War history as an undergraduate to casual learning about my friends’ experiences as Cuban American children of expats over cigars and dominoes, those nine years in Miami created an ever-growing desire to visit the island just a few miles to the south.

So on the eve of this long-awaited trip to Cuba, my anticipation is matched only by my consternation as to what comes next for the homeland of many of my Miami neighbors. While much has been made of Cuban-American détente over the past 15 months, it remains unclear if we are on the cusp of a new era of Cuban prosperity or a gradual slide into a one-dimensional, tourism-centric economy like that of too many of Cuba’s neighbors.

Over the past six weeks our class has heard from a variety of experts whose expectations range from nearly unbridled optimism to dejected acceptance of a dismal future for the Cuban economy. Now, we will learn first-hand over the next week from those on ground who can offer another perspective. We will meet with government officials, restauranteurs, hoteliers, and (of course) cigar producers among other segments of industry to learn about commerce in Cuba as it is and what the future might hold. Internet access allowing, I will post updates along the way.

While tourists across the world scramble to visit Cuba before it changes, I can’t help but feel lucky to visit as it changes. No one can say when the embargo might be lifted, or how a country steeped in nearly three generations of communism can compete in a global economy, but the opportunity to see this unfold in a country with such potential is undoubtedly exciting. And of course the fresh pastelitos won’t hurt.

 

-Mark Adelman ’16

What are your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s