Economic, Cultural, and Ethnic Diversity in Emerging Indonesia

With a full week back in New York to reflect on my experiences in Indonesia, I can’t help but dwell on the implications of the stark differences between our time in Jakarta and Bali. The more I reminisce on our robust economic discussions with the Minister of Finance and breadth of market leadership of the Lippo Group, the more the contrast with the rich cultural adventure we had in Bali begins to crystalize into several interesting takeaways about Indonesia.

  1. Despite its size and potential, Indonesia faces difficult challenges to establishing itself as an economic powerhouse. If a visitor saw only Jakarta, he might walk away thinking Indonesia needs just an investment in infrastructure to establish itself as an economic power. However, the night and day contrast with Bali highlights the geographic fragmentation of the nation, which is much more daunting challenge nationwide than the infrastructure in the capital. For instance, e-commerce is a tremendous area of interest, but can a company like Amazon truly offer two-day shipping to 6,000 inhabited islands each with its own infrastructure issues?
  2. That said, Jakarta may be poised to compete as a regional center of business. I left Jakarta with a strong interest in visiting Singapore and seeing how a more developed Southeast Asian city economy operates. While there are geographic hurdles for the nation as a whole, Jakarta’s infrastructure challenges seem manageable with shrewd planning and wisely-utilized investment. It seems, anecdotally, as though Indonesian talent may be staying or returning home more than in recent history, indicating that the minds may be there to make Jakarta a player in the region.
  3. The challenges Indonesia doesn’t face are as interesting as the ones they do face. Indonesia is a country that is very ethnically diverse and features a tremendous array of cultures and dialects. In addition, it has the largest population of Muslim people in the world, as about 88% of its 250 million people practice Islam. In the 21st century, many other countries that fit these profiles are facing issues of disjointed populations, civil unrest or violence, religious extremism, and other cultural challenges that prevent economic issues from being addressed. This is not the case in Indonesia. Despite cultural differences, Indonesia is largely a unified, harmonious country whose issues are economic, not civic. This speaks volume about the people of this country and its future prospects.

This trip was a great first experience for me in Asia. The opportunity to learn so much about the business environment in an emerging market combined with the utterly unique cultural experience of the Balinese New Year celebrations made for memories I will cherish for years to come. If current or prospective students reading this blog have any doubts about the Chazen experience, I can promise it is among the most enriching I have had.

What are your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s